A Focus on Global Health

Mini Medical School: A Focus on Global Health

Mini Medical School: A Focus on Global Health was designed to broaden understanding of how global health impacts local health. COVID-19 has shown that what happens in one part of the world affects communities everywhere. Session topics explored global health research, capacity building and the nuances of social responsibility.

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Were you unable to attend the live sessions? No worries! We recorded the webinars and they are now available within learning materials.

Session Details

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Global Health and Social Responsibility - Reexamining Medical Missions

Monday, October 5, 2020

The idea of global health may seem exciting...even adventurous. Media and the movies portray it as doctors and researchers traveling the world to tropical locations with a mission to 'save the world'. While this image has inspired generations of well-intentioned global health practitioners to take up the mantle and pursue work in global health, it has also created for-profit industries and interventions that can cause more harm than good. The multi-billion dollar business of voluntourism is just that––a business––and one that profits off well-meaninged do-gooders at the expense of the communities they claim to help. Negative impacts to communities include the loss of jobs due to volunteers from the global north taking on work that could be done by paid community members, undermining of local systems and structures, the use of culturally inappropriate interventions managed without input from experienced and trusted partners, and potentially even most concerning, the medical treatment of patients in underserved communities by personnel that may not be trained or licensed to so.

During session 1 of the University of Minnesota’s Mini Medical School: A Focus on Global Health, a panel of individuals committed to social responsibility will discuss the history and impacts of short-term global health interventions–– with a specific focus on medical missions. By attending the session, you’ll learn how and why global health interventions can be controversial or misguided, and how to evaluate important considerations when engaging with and supporting global health interventions.

Speakers:
Judith Lasker

Judith Lasker, Professor Emerita of Sociology and Health Medicine and Society, Lehigh University

Dr. Judith Lasker is Professor Emerita of Sociology and Health Medicine and Society at Lehigh University in Bethlehem PA, USA and author of Hoping to Help; The Promises and Pitfalls of Global Health Volunteering (Cornell U. Press, 2016). Her book and several related articles examine the impact on host communities and on volunteers of short-term international programs and offer research-based recommendations for making programs more effective. Dr. Lasker has spoken about her research to audiences around the U.S. and in several other countries. Her previous books addressed pregnancy loss, infertility, and time banking. She earned her B.A. at Brandeis and her MA and Ph.D. at Harvard. In 2014, Judith was awarded the Centennial Medal by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard for "contributions to society as they have emerged from one's graduate education at Harvard."
 

Myron Aldrink

Myron J. Aldrink, Chairman, Medical and Surgical Skill Institute

Myron Aldrink has 15 years of experience with healthcare NGOs including; International Aid, Medical Teams International and International Medical Equipment Collaborative.  Myron has been a consultant with Johnson & Johnson since 2005  and chairman of the Medical and Surgical Skills Institute (MSSI) in Ghana West Africa.  He also has conducted research studies in Africa in conjunction with Johnson & Johnson and the University of Michigan Medical School  regarding improving emergency obstetric by training non-physician health workers (Task shifting).  

Myron served as Chairman of PQMD (Partnership of Quality Medical Donations) and is currently involved with a coalition – Advocacy for Global Health Partnerships – promoting appropriate short-term engagements.
 

Bruce Compton

Bruce Compton, Senior Director of Global Health, Catholic Health Association of the United States

Bruce Compton is senior director of global health for the Catholic Health Association of the United States. He is based in the association's St. Louis office. Mr. Compton is responsible for assisting and supporting CHA-member organizations in their outreach activities in the developing world. His duties include facilitating collaboration among CHA-member organizations and others, seeking to enhance the impact of international ministries. Additionally, he is responsible for education regarding international outreach issues and encouraging CHA members' participation in various activities of international ministry.

Mr. Compton lived in Haiti from 2000 to 2002, and he continued to work in support of health missions in the developing world after he returned to the U.S. He did so in his capacity as founding president and chief executive of Springfield, Ill.–based Hospital Sisters Mission Outreach, a ministry organization bringing surplus medical supplies from Midwest hospitals to medical missions in the developing world.

Content Lead and Moderator:

Shailey Prasad

Shailey Prasad MD MPH, is executive director of the University of Minnesota Center for Global Health and Social Responsibility and Vice-Chair for Education at the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health.

He is actively involved with undergraduate, medical student, and residency education. He has extensive experience working in underserved areas around the world, from forest tribes in southern India to rural Mississippi, advocating that health is critical to the overall development of an area. He has also been part of research teams in health services research and rural health and is actively involved in developing primary care in various parts of the world.

Global Health is Local Health - Connecting Global Health to the Health of Minnesota

Monday, October 12, 2020

The social determinants of health––the conditions in which we live, work, and play––are universal. Or global in this case. Social forces such as systemic racism, unfair economic systems, marginalization, and maldistribution of power shape access to adequate housing, employment, education, food, and water in ways that translate into the health inequities we witness in our communities, no matter where we live. Global health champions around the world work to decrease these inequities to improve the health of all—and not just around the world, but also locally. They take the frameworks of global health and apply it to a local context to improve the health of communities in Minnesota.  

During session 2 of the University of Minnesota’s Mini Medical School: A Focus on Global Health, a group of global health experts working in local contexts will discuss the intersection of global and local health, the social determinants of health, and global health considerations in Minnesota. By attending the session, you’ll learn how to engage in critical thinking on how the frameworks of global health and the social determinants of health can impact your understanding of health inequities and interventions locally in Minnesota; how to identify examples of global-local health initiatives and organizations that are working in the local Minnesota community; and how to reflect on your own personal connection to global, local, and community health.

Speakers:
Westerhaus

Michael Westerhaus, MD, MA, Assistant Professor, Global Medicine, University of Minnesota

Michael Westerhaus aims to understand and respond to structural forces in society that create poor health and health inequities. As a primary care clinician at the Center for International Health, he seeks to bear witness to the lived experience of refugees in order to support their efforts to overcome barriers to health. As an educator with the organization SocMed and as a member of the Global Medicine Faculty at the University of Minnesota, he teaches social medicine and utilizes experiential and action-based methods to elevate the critical consciousness of health professionals. He also serves as Program Director for the BRIIDGE program, which prepares international medical graduates for successful entry into U.S. residency training programs. As a founding member of the Social Medicine Consortium, he leads efforts with a global community of partners who utilize social medicine education and strategic community organizing to mobilize power to advance health equity. He received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School in 2006 and completed the Global Health Equity residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in 2010. He also received a Master’s in medical anthropology from Harvard University in 2005.

Roli Dwivedi

Roli Dwivedi, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Minnesota; Chief Clinical Officer - Community-University Health Care Center

Dr. Dwivedi is an Assistant Professor of Family Medicine and Community Health and Chief Clinical Officer at the Community-University health care center at the University of Minnesota. She  received her medical training at Vaishampayan Memorial Medical School in India, and completed residency in Family Medicine at the University of Minnesota. She is involved with several leadership and quality committees all across Minnesota and serves as director at large within the executive committee of Minnesota AFP. She is an educator and likes to create new models of teaching and culturally competent care deliveries. Her interest in education includes global health and culturally sensitive care, as well as improving health disparities in addition to mentoring medical students and residents

Vero Svetaz

Maria Veronica Svetaz, MD, MPH, Faculty Family Practice and Adolescent Health Boarded Physician, Hennepin County Medical Center

Maria Veronica Svetaz, MD, MPH is a cisgender, immigrant Latinx Family Medicine physician at Hennepin Healthcare Department of Family and Community Medicine, and Faculty at the Leadership Education in Adolescent Health, Department of General Peds at the University of Minnesota. Originally from Argentina, she designed and directs Aqui Para Ti/Here for You youth development program since 2002, funded by the Eliminating Health Disparities Initiative Grant, from MN Department of Health. This program has received multiple National Awards, most importantly the 2014 Millar Award to Innovation in Adolescent Care, by the Society of Adolescent Health (SAHM).

Dr. Svetaz also developed a system-wide program called “Henne-Teen” (now renamed “Between Us”), to create comprehensive spaces for teens, teens and their parents, and both with providers. Her research focuses on Creating Inclusive Programs, caring for Immigrants and Refugees, Racism and its effect on health, Parenting youth of color, and Health Equity for teens, their families, and their communities.

She currently a Consultant (recent past Chair) of the Society of Adolescent Health and Medicine (SAHM)’s Diversity Committee, and a member of SAHM’ S Nomination Committee, she  is part of the Department of Human Services (DHS)’ Behavioral Health Home Advisory Board, as well as several initiatives on health Equity and Immigration at different MN organizations. She is the Co-Chair of WONCA (international Organization for Family Doctors) SIG on Adolescent Health.

Moderator:

Shailey Prasad

Shailey Prasad MD MPH, is executive director of the University of Minnesota Center for Global Health and Social Responsibility and Vice-Chair for Education at the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health.

He is actively involved with undergraduate, medical student, and residency education. He has extensive experience working in underserved areas around the world, from forest tribes in southern India to rural Mississippi, advocating that health is critical to the overall development of an area. He has also been part of research teams in health services research and rural health and is actively involved in developing primary care in various parts of the world.

Global Health Research -The Importance of Global Collaboration to Battle Global Threats

Monday, October 19, 2020

As we’ve seen this year with the COVID-19 pandemic, infectious diseases can easily and rapidly spread across cities, countries, and continents. Even before the pandemic, global health researchers and practitioners have explored how potential solutions to health challenges in other parts of the world can also solve challenges within our own backyard. And in some cases, the research to solve a health issue in Minnesota can actually only be conducted in other parts of the world. So how can we successfully conduct this type of research? The key to our global health research at the University of Minnesota is mutually-beneficial and sustainable partnerships.

During session 3 of the University of Minnesota’s Mini Medical School: A Focus on Global Health, a group of global health experts working around the world will discuss the importance of partnership building in global health research, and the value and impact of global health research. By attending the session, you’ll learn how to explain the ways in which global health research can impact local health outcomes in the US, and how the University of Minnesota’s support for global health research around the world comes back to impact Minnesota.

Speakers:

David B

David Boulware, MD, MPH, Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and International Medicine, Medical School, University of Minnesota

Dr. David Boulware is an infectious disease physician-scientist with formal training in clinical trials, public health, and tropical medicine. Dr. Boulware combines his clinical research with nested basic science investigations into disease pathogenesis to conduct translational research. His primary research interests are in meningitis in resource-limited areas including diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and quality improvement initiatives incorporating cost-effectiveness analyses in order to translate knowledge into improved care. Dr. Boulware’s current research is focused on improving the clinical outcomes of HIV-infected persons with cryptococcal meningitis, the second most common AIDS-defining opportunistic infection in Sub-Saharan Africa and the most common cause of adult meningitis. Additionally, Dr. Boulware has been motivated to improve the diagnostics for TB meningitis, and now that TB meningitis can be promptly diagnosed, to also improve the treatment of tuberculous meningitis. Dr. Boulware leads a multidisciplinary, international research team with active research collaborations with partners in Uganda, South Africa, Ethiopia, Brazil, Botswana, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom.

Kumi Smith

Kumi Smith, PhD, Assistant Professor, Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

I study HIV and STI epidemiology, particularly in resource limited settings. I am also interested in infectious disease dynamics, social determinants of health, and health equity. I am also the director of the HIV/STI Intervention and Prevention Studies (HIPS).

Omondi Paul George

George Omondi Paul, MS, Post-Doctoral Associate, Veterinary Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota

Dr. George Omondi is an epidemiologist, and currently a postdoctoral associate at the University of Minnesota – College of Veterinary Medicine. His research focuses on socioecological determinants of disease, and how these can be modified to improve public health in marginalized populations. George was a recipient of the Fogarty fellowship through the Center for Global Health and Social Responsibility. Through this fellowship, George spent a year conducting research on zoonotic tuberculosis within a Maasai pastoralist community in Kenya. This study revealed that livestock associated sociocultural practices including buying and selling of livestock, and consumption of raw animal products shape the patterns of tuberculosis in this community. This study further showed that zoonotic tuberculosis (from cattle, sheep and goats) occur at a higher level than previously thought. Currently, Dr. Omondi is leading two broad research efforts focused on One Health. First, validating and optimizing the diagnosis of tuberculosis, and capacity building for veterinarians in infectious disease management. Secondly, the Mara Health Program – an integrated program in southwestern Kenya looking at zoonotic diseases at the human-livestock-wildlife interface, with a specific interest in epidemiology of zoonotic tuberculosis amongst other diseases.

Montse Torremorell

Montserrat Torremorell, DVM, PhD, Veterinary Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota

Dr. Torremorell is an infectious disease animal health expert with extensive background in disease control, biosecurity strategies and research to improve the health of pigs and their systems.  She joined the University of Minnesota in 2009 and conducts research of economically significant swine diseases focusing on the transmission, control and elimination of influenza and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome viruses. She works at the intersection of epidemiology, virology, animal models and genomics, has a special interest in airborne diseases and researches biosecurity technologies to prevent and mitigate airborne infections in pigs. She teaches in Veterinary Medicine to both, DVM and graduate students and is passionate about helping producers and veterinarians to apply science to control diseases. Dr. Torremorell is the author of more than 100 peer-reviewed journal articles and more than 400 abstracts and articles in conference proceedings.

Content Lead:

Molly McCoy, CGHSR Global Research and Training Coordinator

Molly is the Global Research and Training Coordinator in CGHSR and has been working to advance opportunities for students to become inspired by research through hands-on experiences and mentorship since she joined the team in 2015. She manages resources for UMN faculty and students through the East Africa Network in partnership with Martha Kandole, as well as the Fogarty Global Health Fellowship Program, CGHSR Scholars, and the Faculty Mentor Awards. Before coming to CGHSR, Molly worked in the Division of Global Pediatrics in the UMN Medical School as a research program manager for research studies in Kenya and Uganda. She first became intrigued by global health and education as a student and after graduating, as a staff member at the Institute for Global Studies where she worked with K-12 educators on internationalizing curriculum. Molly served in the Peace Corps in South Africa, and studied abroad in Senegal.